The Members of the Band

Hebric are a four piece folk band based in West Yorkshire. with decades of experience singing and playing numerous instruments and entertaining audiences.

Phil “Jimi” Bond – plays guitar, mandola and sings. He’s played in club and ceilidh bands but devoted many of the years after Hebric to his family and developing his own business. Post Hebric, Jimi played in a working men’s club band for many years, rocking away to Elvis et al.  Early in 2016 his daughter’s partner, Ben, restrung his 45 year old Yamaha guitar for him (some say that was the first time ever!). He used this at John & Dave’s parties & loved playing for real again. He’s even splashed out money on a swanky new guitar & worked out what those pegs at the neck end of the guitar are for.

John Bromley – Plays whistles, bodhran and occasional guitar but is justly well known for his phenomenal voice. It’s been used in numerous recordings, folk clubs, folk festivals and in Leeds Grand Theatre with Opera North. His most recent outings are with Kimbers Men and The Bromleys – dad, daughter & son. Both these bands are great and are gigging regularly – get to see them if you can.

Dave Calvert – Sings and plays guitar, banjo and occasional mandola/mandolin. In fact he’s a bit sentimental about all his old guitars and has been known to get them all out of their cases just to gaze in awe at them. He is also an enthusiastic bass player but doesn’t inflict this on Hebric audiences. In recent years he has played and recorded with local folk, ceilidh, rock & blues “outfits”. Anyone who likes blues should check out The Blues Roots Band – Dave’s other current band.

Malcolm Stocks – Plays accordion and occasional guitar and mandolin. Malcolm plays in ceilidh bands & provides music for the (in)famous Bradshaw Mummers. He’s done guest spots in and recorded with many local folk bands and is a regular attendee at open sessions. As well as being a really accomplished musician his collection of wonderful & not so wonderful accordions and guitars has to be seen to be believed.